2012 Player-By-Player Wrap Up: Corey Brown

 

 

Throughout the offseason, The Nats Blog will look back at every player’s 2012 season to summarize and analyze his performance, and we’ll look ahead to his possible role in 2013. We’ll go from #1 Steve Lombardozzi all the way to #63 Henry Rodriguez with about two posts per week until Spring Training. Enjoy.

Outfielder Corey Brown was one of the reasons the Washington Nationals were able to remain resilient during the 2012 season when a multitude of injures struck. Brown spent most of his season at Triple-A Syracuse, where he hit 22 doubles and 25 home runs, combining for a slash line of .285/.365/.523. His stellar performance there earned him the right of being called up with the likes of Bryce Harper and Tyler Moore to fill holes in the Nats often injury-riddled roster.

Although he traveled back and forth from the majors to the minors for much of the season, simply filling in for the Nationals when he was called upon, Brown wasn’t without his major league highlight-reel moments. He showed off his potential for power on the big stage by hitting three of his five hits on the year for extra bases: two doubles and a home run. The home run – against the Milwaukee Brewers on July 28 – was also his first major-league hit.

But perhaps his biggest moment of the year, and even of his career, was the walk-off single he hit to lock up a win for the Nats against the Miami Marlins after a deluge, a two-hour and 33-minute rain delay, a chicken salad and a Jayson Werth home run.

Next year: At 26 years old, Brown still has potential to develop into a powerful major-league hitter. But despite his coming up big for the Nationals in situations like the rain-delay game, they simply don’t have room for him in their already clogged outfield. Brown’s big bat is what will make him an excellent trade piece if he is not sent back down to the minors for the 2013 season.

Next up: #11 Ryan Zimmerman

 

About Joe Drugan

Managing editor of The Nats Blog and co-host of the Nats Talk On The Go podcast.

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